Posts Tagged ‘ Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows ’

Harry Potter: the wizard, the wand, the wonder

A couple of weeks ago, I went to the midnight premiere of “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part I” with friends. Not naive enough to think we could get tickets the night of the show, we purchased our tickets a few weeks in advance. One of my friends had been counting down the days until the premiere pretty much since the date of the premiere was announced.

We got to the theater a couple hours early, and it’s a good thing we did: the movie theater we went to was bustling with hundreds of excited young people. The auditorium we were assigned to was already packed with people decked in red and gold scarves or full-on character costumes, carrying wands of different varieties.

As I sat in theater, anxious and excited to see the first part of the final installment in the series that is beloved by so many, one of my friends said something along the lines of, “I forgot how big of a deal this is.” And she’s so right–Harry Potter IS a big deal.

And while people of all ages enjoy the series about the wizard and his adventures (my mom included), my generation has truly grown up with Harry Potter. I was seven when the first book was published in 1997, and I’ll admit, I thought the whole concept sounded pretty strange. It wasn’t until more books were released and my friends urged/forced me to start reading the series that I began to realize just how wonderful the books are. I was not alone in this realization: I can count on one hand the few friends around my age group who honestly don’t like Harry Potter. And most of them haven’t really read the books.

I can’t think of anything else that has been as much of a cultural phenomenon for my generation than the Harry Potter series. For that, I think J.K. Rowling is absolutely amazing. Funny and lighthearted at times, dark and thrilling in others, this series appeals to girls and boys, men and women. I can honestly say that when I look back on my childhood, Harry Potter will be a large part of it. So thank you, J.K. Rowling, for delighting readers for years past and, in all likelihood, many years to come.

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